Why Sensory-Friendly in Today’s World?

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Did you know?  More and more events, locations, products, and services are becoming sensory-friendly.  Maybe you have seen friends and family seeking out sensory-friendly experiences.  Thankfully, many people, businesses, and organizations help. They influence events, locations, products, and services to adopt sensory-friendly practices.

As an example, you make plans to go to the newest, trendiest restaurant in town.  A night out with your friends and family. It was supposed to be a great evening.  But…

It was not.  You did not enjoy it.  Because it was crowded.  And had flashing lights on the walls.  An open kitchen.  And an open concept floor plan design.  Moreover, it had exposed brick, and exposed duct-work.  As a result, you could not converse with your dinner companions over the noise.  Nor could you ignore the many visual and sound distractions.  You’ve likely experienced something just like that.

Woman standing covering her ears from sensory overload.

Why sensory-friendly is important.

Too busy, too noisy, and too bright are everyday occurrences for 1/3 of the population. This includes all the groups of people who report, or self-identify, with experiencing sensory sensitivity or sensory overload.  For example, these are people with autism, anxiety, PTSD, concussion, hearing loss, trauma and many other chronic conditions, disabilities, disorder or difficulties.  Invariably, you likely know someone with that underlying condition in your friend or family group.  In addition, sensory sensitivity simply happens more often in a world that is increasingly busy, noisy, and bright.

Furthermore, that “1/3 of the population” who are sensory sensitive is on the rise.  Notwithstanding that many of those underlying conditions are being diagnosed at increasing rates.

For example, in May of 2019, “sensory overload” was being searched on Google 27,000 times a month.  However, by November of 2019, “sensory overload” was being searched 33,000 times a month.

The number of Google News items about 5 sensory-friendly keywords has increased exponentially in the last 5 years.  From negligible in 2015, to 698 by mid-November of 2019, for example.

In another instance, Google News Alerts alone identified 75 sensory-friendly events or locations in North America in just 7 days. How do we know? We counted for you!

Quote stating, "Too busy, too noisy, and too bright are everyday occurrences for 1/3 of the population. This includes all the groups of people who report, or self-identify, with experiencing sensory sensitivity or sensory overload."

How do we find a sensory-friendly solution?

You may not know how to make something sensory-friendly. Moreover, you may not know what the term means. At Sensory Friendly Solutions, we step in and fill the knowledge-gap. As a result, we help events, locations, products, and services become sensory-friendly.  Furthermore, we are grateful there are so many other people, organizations, and businesses influencing the world to adopt sensory-friendly too!

We all want the same thing: more sensory-friendly. So, let’s work together to make it happen! Read our guest blog post for Autism BC that shares answers to common questions about becoming sensory-friendly.

Do you know of a sensory-friendly champion?  Then read this: Darian’s Story and get a certificate of appreciation to share.

If you want to advocate for a business or an organization to become sensory-friendly.  Download an advocacy letter you can edit and use.  No email sign-up necessary.  Just download it.  Use it to help make the world more sensory-friendly today! For example, send it off to a business or organization.  Most importantly, encourage them to become sensory-friendly.

Finally, are you looking for more examples?  There are many of them.  Find different businesses, organizations, and services that are sensory-friendly:

Join the sensory-friendly community!

Illustration of group of people. Ages ranges from babies to seniors. Some people are in wheelchair or scooter, pushing a baby stroller, have a prostetic limb or wear a hijab. All designed in a blue and orange colour pallet.

Join 1,500+ people. Receive more sensory-friendly tips and strategies!

Sensory overload is overwhelming, but the solutions can be simple. Our founder Christel Seeberger saw how sensory sensitivity and overload negatively affects people’s lives. Join her on the simple but effective journey to being more sensory-friendly via our short, periodic emails.

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