Blog Category: Things to Do

Santa Clause waving at a sensory-friendly parade.

Choose a Sensory Friendly Santa Claus Parade for Your Child

Parades are a sensory-rich experience. As a result, parades are often a Christmas event that is not accessible to many families. Is that true for your family? Sensory-rich means there is a lot of things in the location or event that stimulate the senses. Moreover, you have more than 5 senses. For many children (and

Family on Christmas morning unwrapping presents.

5 steps to a Sensory Friendly Christmas

Christmas is an exciting time of the year for families to celebrate the holiday season. Getting together with friends and family, visiting Santa and watching a Santa Claus Parade are all part of the fun.  However, for many children and adults, Christmas is stressful. The change in routine, interacting with strangers and being in large

Santa claus reading a story to two children

How to Offer a Sensitive Santa Event

Ever notice that some children struggle when visiting Santa? You might witness both tears and terror in children. If you are responsible for organizing a Santa Claus event, there is a solution to make Santa welcoming to more children and enjoyed by more children. For many children, visiting Santa contributes to sensory overload. In particular

Grandparents and grandchildren gathered around the Thanksgiving dinner table smiling.

Host a Sensory Friendly Thanksgiving Event

For many people Thanksgiving is an exciting time of the year for family, friends, neighbours, congregations and communities to come together and celebrate. However, for a large number of children and adults, gatherings are overwhelming and stressful. Ultimately, this may deter many people participating in Thanksgiving celebrations. You can make people comfortable and be more

Family smiling at dinner table during sensory-friendly Thanksgiving.

7 Ways to Have a Sensory Friendly Thanksgiving

As Thanksgiving celebrations approach, you may worry about how to make the holidays enjoyable for your sensory-sensitive child (or even yourself). Although many people enjoy Thanksgiving, celebrating and spending time with family and friends; for many children, and adults, contribute to sensory overload and stress. Thanksgiving can be a particular challenge for children with sensory

Diverse group of children wearing Halloween costumes.

Make Halloween Sensory Friendly for your Child

If you have an autistic child, or a child with sensory disorder you likely know that Halloween can be an overwhelming celebration. There are scary and loud decorations, uncomfortable costumes and groups children running around. As a result, your child is likely hesitant to enjoy Halloween. Trick-or-treating contributes to sensory overload. However, there are simple

Harbour Passage red coloured city walking path on the water front.

Sensory-Friendly Tourist Attraction: City Walking Path

Looking for a sensory-friendly activity to do? Maybe in your hometown? Or something simple while traveling? Moreover, if someone is your family has sensory sensitivities, finding an activity can be a challenge. For many people, popular outdoor activities such as swimming or parks are overwhelming. Oftentimes, tourist attractions are too loud, busy and sensory-rich. An

Young family sitting on hotel bed with suitcase while on a sensory-friendly vacation.

Plan a Sensory-Friendly Vacation

Are you planning your next vacation? Does a member of your family struggle with sensory sensitivity or sensory overload? Traveling can be stressful and challenging at the best of times! Especially so following COVID-19 and long periods of social isolation. A sensory-friendly vacation is a solution for a less stressful and more enjoyable vacation, be

A woman her two daughters standing in a busy airport.

Sensory-Friendly Post-Pandemic Travel

As post pandemic travel opens up again, are you planning a trip for work or vacation? As people become adjust to travel opening back up, sensory overload remains a concern. Therefore, it is important to consider the impact on your own personal sensory preferences on post pandemic travel. Sensory Overload and COVID-19 Sensory sensitivity and

Graphic stating, "The Andy Warhol Museum's Virtual Sensory-Friendly Workshop!"

An Art Museum Hosts a Virtual Sensory-Friendly Workshop

Picture this: You join a Zoom call. You first see a gallery of new faces. You hear scattered chatter in the group.  People interrupt one another.  They apologize for their audio delays. You notice a cluttered workspace behind some.  While other participants have a bright, patterned virtual background. You notice that people walk behind another participant on camera. While another is interrupted by their barking dog.  And the

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