Blog Month: October 2021

Three young girls at standing on trampoline at indoor recreation center.

Make your Sport or Recreation Center Sensory-Friendly

Are accessibility and inclusion important to you? Indoor and outdoor recreation centers or rec centers, sports centers or clubs, community centers, activity centers, and play parks are busy, noisy and bright! For people of all ages who experience sensory sensitivity or sensory overload, a busy, noisy and bright environment is a barrier. As a result,

Young girl in wheelchair holding racket on tennis court.

Disabled Person or Person With a Disability?

Many people are confused and apprehensive about how to refer to different groups of people. That includes people with disabilities, as well as older adults, for example. The words you use change over time and new words emerge. Simply put, it is often unclear how to refer to other people in a way that is

A young family of four sitting around a camp fire smiling.

Essentials for Sensory-Friendly Camping Experience

For many families, camping is a yearly traditional event. Camping is a way for families to travel and spend quality time in nature together. Additionally, for many families, camping is a financially accessible way to go on a relaxing vacation. However, for families that have a family member with sensory sensitivities, camping is not a

Santa Claus and Mrs. Clause waving to the crowd at a sensory-friendly parade.

Choose a Sensory Friendly Santa Claus Parade for Your Child

Parades are a sensory-rich experience. As a result, parades are often a Christmas event that is not accessible to many families. Is that true for your family? Sensory-rich means there is a lot of things in the location or event that stimulate the senses. Moreover, you have more than 5 senses. For many children (and

Family on Christmas morning unwrapping presents.

5 Steps to a Sensory Friendly Christmas

Christmas is an exciting time of the year for families to celebrate the holiday season. Getting together with friends and family, visiting Santa and watching a Santa Claus Parade are all part of the fun.  However, for many children and adults, Christmas is stressful. The change in routine, interacting with strangers and being in large

Santa claus reading a story to two children

Sensory-Friendly Santa 

Ever noticed that some children struggle when visiting Santa? You might witness both tears and terror in children. If you are responsible for organizing a Santa Claus event, there is a solution to make Santa welcoming to more children and enjoyed by more children. For many children, visiting Santa contributes to sensory overload. In particular,

Young person sitting on Sensitive Santa's lap whispering into ear.

Make Your Child’s Visit to Santa a Success

Does your child struggle visiting Santa? For many children, going to see Santa is overwhelming. Visiting Santa can cause stress and anxiety. It can contribute to sensory overload. Children with sensory disorders or autism, visiting Santa is challenging because it is a sensory-rich experience. Your child may be upset, and not want to participate. Ultimately,

Grandparents and grandchildren gathered around the Thanksgiving dinner table smiling.

Host a Sensory Friendly Thanksgiving Event

For many people Thanksgiving is an exciting time of the year for family, friends, neighbours, congregations and communities to come together and celebrate. However, for a large number of children and adults, gatherings are overwhelming and stressful. Ultimately, this may deter many people participating in Thanksgiving celebrations. You can make people comfortable and be more

Family smiling at dinner table during sensory-friendly Thanksgiving.

How to Have a Sensory-Friendly Thanksgiving 

As Thanksgiving celebrations approach, you may worry about how to make the holidays enjoyable for your sensory-sensitive child (or even yourself). Although many people enjoy Thanksgiving, celebrating and spending time with family and friends, many children and adults contribute to sensory overload and stress. Thanksgiving can be a particular challenge for children with sensory processing

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